When I was growing up, my parents and I lived in the suburbs of Toronto.

We had no choice, we couldn’t afford a home in the city, but we wanted to do something about it.

I’m glad I’m living in Canada.

Here’s why.

1.

The Canadian dream The most important factor in choosing a place to settle down in Canada is where you grew up.

In this country, there are more than 400 cities with populations over 100,000.

Each of those cities has its own unique culture, culture, and language.

It’s a unique melting pot.

If you’re an immigrant from Asia, for example, you have your own distinct identity and lifestyle.

If your family came from Europe, they have their own distinct language, and so on.

If my mother was a German immigrant from Bavaria, she’d have her own distinct culture.

The more European your roots are, the more unique and interesting your life is. 2.

Canadians can be Canadian too The best part about living in the country is that you can choose to live somewhere in Canada, even if you are from outside the country.

In fact, if you have a Canadian passport and your parents live in another country, you can apply for permanent residence.

The process can be lengthy and costly.

Once you’ve applied, your application will be forwarded to the immigration minister.

Once the immigration officer makes the final decision, you’ll be able to move back home.

3.

The diversity in Canada There are over 1.3 million immigrants living in Vancouver, Toronto, Montreal, and other cities in Canada alone.

There are also millions of other people living in these cities who are immigrants themselves.

There’s a lot of room for everyone, regardless of their origin, to feel like they’re part of Canada.

There is also a lot more room for newcomers, like me.

The people who live here have helped build this country.

4.

The most diverse cities in the world While we’re not quite as diverse as Europe, Canada is one of the most diverse countries in the developed world.

That’s partly because it has the lowest poverty rate in the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development), as well as because the majority of its population lives in poverty.

In many cases, people don’t feel like a burden.

They just want to be accepted.

There isn’t any social stigma.

For example, there’s a big difference between immigrants living here and Canadians living in Europe.

The former feel like outsiders, the latter don’t want to feel that way.

5.

Canadian immigrants often have higher incomes than their European counterparts Because Canada has a high level of immigration from outside of Europe, many Canadians who are new to the country end up earning more than their peers.

This is because Canada’s economy relies heavily on immigration and because many of its immigrants are more educated than their native-born counterparts.

They’re more likely to earn higher wages.

6.

More Canadians are educated than Europeans They’re not the only reason that people here have higher levels of education.

They also tend to be wealthier than their neighbours.

There were more than 1.2 million immigrants with a university degree in Canada in 2016.

They are also more likely than Europeans to have higher-paying jobs.

And while they’re less likely to be immigrants themselves, immigrants can still get ahead by working their way up the ladder.

7.

The quality of life in Canada The quality and diversity of life can be one of Canada’s biggest challenges.

It may seem overwhelming to some, but it’s really not.

People can enjoy life here without feeling like they have to put in the hard work.

The fact is, people from all walks of life have a chance to improve their life here.

It doesn’t have to be hard.

It just has to be possible.

8.

You can choose where you settle If you want to go to Canada, there is a big chance you can find a place that suits your needs and tastes.

In some cases, there may be a better option.

For instance, if I wanted to settle in Vancouver for a year, it would be a great choice.

The area has a rich culture, a growing tech industry, and a large Asian population.

But I wanted something that was less busy and more accessible.

I could go to a popular dive bar and meet my friends and make friends there.

I also could work out on the patio at a popular yoga studio.

The whole experience was really enjoyable.

My choice is simple: I can live where I like.

If I wanted a bigger house, a nicer condo, and better access to public transit, I could live in Toronto or Vancouver.

I would also like to get a good education, get married, and have a good job.

I don’t have a problem finding a place where I feel like I belong.

9.

Canadians have a long way to go in order to make it as successful in the United States There are a lot factors that make it easier for Canadians to succeed in the